Texas primary runoff election guide 2022 – KVUE.com

In March, Texas voters cast their ballots in the primary election. But not every race had a clear winner. While we know, for example, who the candidates will be for the governor’s race in November, several other matchups await the results of a runoff election.

This year’s Texas primary runoff election will be held on Tuesday, May 24. 

The last day to register to vote in the primary runoff election was April 25. However, you can still check online to see if you are currently registered.

Early voting will be held from Monday, May 16, through Friday, May 20.

Here is everything you need to know about voting in the primary runoff election, from polling locations to what you may see on your ballot.

What is a primary runoff election?:

Texas is an open primary state. That means voters don’t register as members of a particular political party. Instead, eligible Texas voters can cast a ballot in either party’s primary election, but not both. The same goes for the runoff election from a primary election.

At the polls, you’ll have to choose whether you want to vote in the Democratic or Republican primary runoff. Then you’ll be selecting among members of your chosen primary runoof when you cast your vote.

So, for example: If you choose to vote in the Republican primary runoff election on May 24, you’ll be able to choose which Republican candidate for attorney general should be on the ballot in November, but you will not be able to choose which Democratic candidate for lieutenant governor should be in the running.

There will be no propositions on the May 24 ballot.

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When and where you can vote:

Registered and eligible Texas voters may vote at any early voting location located in the county in which they live. 

Early voting locations will be populated through the Vote Texas website two days before the first day of early voting. All voters have to do is plug in their information in order to find polling locations.

Early voting for the Texas primary runoff election starts on Monday, May 16, and runs through Friday, May 20. During early voting, polling place hours vary at each location. 

On Election Day, May 24, things work a little differently.

You will want to see if the county you live in participates in the Countywide Polling Place Program (CWPP). If your county does participate in CWPP, you can vote at any polling place in the county. If your county doesn’t participate in CWPP, you can only vote at the polling place assigned to you on Election Day.

On Election Day, all polling places across Texas are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. As long as you get in line before 7 p.m., you will be able to vote.

What you need to bring to vote:

To vote in Texas, you need to have a form of identification when you go to cast your ballot at a polling location. Here is a list of acceptable forms of photo identification:

  • Texas Driver License issued by the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS)
  • Texas Election Identification Certificate issued by DPS
  • Texas Personal Identification Card issued by DPS
  • Texas Handgun License issued by DPS
  • U.S. Military Identification Card containing the person’s photograph
  • U.S. Citizenship Certificate containing the person’s photograph
  • U.S. Passport (book or card)

If you don’t have one of the forms of ID listed above and can’t reasonably obtain one, you can bring one of the following in order to execute a “Reasonable Impediment Declaration”:

  • Copy or original of a government document that shows the voter’s name and an address, including the voter’s voter registration certificate
  • Copy of or original current utility bill
  • Copy of or original bank statement
  • Copy of or original government check
  • Copy of or original paycheck
  • Copy of or original of (a) a certified domestic (from a U.S. state or territory) birth certificate or (b) a document confirming birth admissible in a court of law which establishes the voter’s identity (which may include a foreign birth document)

What will be on the ballot?:

As mentioned earlier, the May 24 Texas primary runoff election is made up of races that did not have clear winners after the results were tallied from the March 1 primary election. These races include the Republican and Democratic candidates for attorney general, Democratic candidate for lieutenant governor and several others.

Here’s a look at some of the key races you may see on your ballot, depending on where you live and which primary you choose to vote in.

Statewide runoff races

Lieutenant Governor – Democratic

Incumbent Republican Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick won his primary in March. In November, he will face the winner of the primary runoff election between Democrats Mike Collier and Michelle Beckley.

Attorney General – Both parties

Neither the Republican nor Democratic primaries for the attorney general’s race had a clear winner. 

In the Republican primary runoff election, incumbent AG Ken Paxton will again face George P. Bush. In the Democratic primary runoff election, Rochelle Garza and Joe Jaworski will face off.

The winners of each runoff election will face each other in the November race for AG.

Land Commissioner – Both parties

Similarly, both November candidates for land commissioner still need to be decided after neither primary race had a clear winner. 

Republicans Dawn Buckingham and Tim Westley will face each other in the primary runoff election, as will Democrats Sandragrace Martinez and Jay Kleberg.

The winners of each runoff election will face each other in the November race for land commissioner.

Comptroller – Democratic

Incumbent Republican Comptroller Glenn Hegar won his primary in March. In November, he will face the winner of the primary runoff election between Democrats Janet T. Dudding and Angel Luis Vega.

Railroad Commissioner – Republican

Incumbent Wayne Christian and Sarah Stogner will face each other in a primary runoff for the Republican candidate for railroad commissioner. Whoever wins will face Democrat Luke Warford in November.

U.S. House of Representatives runoff races

District 21 – Democratic

(Blanco, Gillespie, Hays, Travis counties) 

Incumbent Chip Roy won the Republican primary in March. In November, he will face the winner of the primary runoff election between Democrats Claudia Andreana Zapata and Ricardo Villarreal.

District 35 – Republican

(Hays, Travis counties) 

Republicans Dan McQueen and Michael Rodriguez will face off in the primary runoff election. Whoever wins will face Democrat Greg Casar in November.

District 37 – Republican

(Travis, Williamson counties) 

Republicans Jenni Garcia Sharon and Rod Lingsch will face off in the primary runoff election. Whoever wins will face Democrat Lloyd Doggett in November.

State runoff races in Texas

Texas Senate District 24 – Republican

(Burnet, Gillespie, Llano counties) 

Republicans Pete Flores and Raul Reyes will face off in the primary runoff election. Whoever wins will face Democrat Kathy Jones-Hospod in November.

Texas House District 17 – Republican

(Bastrop, Caldwell, Lee counties) 

Republicans Stan Gerdes and Paul Pape will face off in the primary runoff election. Whoever wins will face Democrat Madeline Eden in November.

Texas House District 19 – Republican

(Blanco, Burnet, Gillespie, Travis counties) 

Republicans Ellen Troxclair and Justin Berry will face off in the primary runoff election. Whoever wins will face Democrat Pam Baggett in November.

Texas House District 52 – Republican

(Williamson County) 

Republicans Patrick McGuinness and Caroline Harris will face off in the primary runoff election. Whoever wins will face Democrat Luis Echegaray in November.

Texas House District 73 – Republican

(Hays County) 

Republicans Barron Casteel and Carrie Isaac will face off in the primary runoff election. Whoever wins will face Democrat Justin Calhoun in November.

Texas House District  85 – Republican

(Fayette County) 

Incumbent Republican Phil Stephenson and Stan Kitzman will face off in the primary runoff election. Whoever wins will face Democrat Larry E. Baggett in November.

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