The Atlantic Daily: Start Preparing for Trump v. Biden in 2024 – The Atlantic

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Former President Trump giving a thumbs up
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The 2024 presidential election could very well be a rematch of 2020. “A Trump candidacy in 2024 is almost certain, and a nomination is probable,” my colleague David A. Graham points out. Should an incumbent Joe Biden decide to go for a second term, that’d leave Americans with a case of electoral déjà vu.

If Trump does end up back on the ballot, he presents unique problems for the country, considering that the last time he was a candidate, he attempted to subvert the entire American democratic system.

  • Trump could try to steal the election. That would make Vice President Kamala Harris, in her capacity as Senate leader, the last Democrat standing. “​​What will she do—what can she do—if Republicans empowered with congressional majorities refuse to accept the certification of a Democratic win in one or more key states?” Russell Berman asks.

  • Or he could win outright—and that would be even worse. “If Trump were to win fairly in 2024, he could and probably would subvert the rule of law and the democratic rule just as much as if he lost and tried to steal the election, but he’d do so from a place of greater legitimacy,” Graham points out.

  • A Trump win is more likely if Biden neglects these five things. The current president risks losing reelection if he doesn’t act effectively on the pandemic, inflation, and more, David Frum argues.

Astronaut in space with a number one foam finger on
Getty; The Atlantic

The news in three sentences:

(1) An FDA analysis raised concerns about the strength of Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 booster-shot data. (2) U.S. consumer inflation continues to rise. (3) William Shatner went to space on a Jeff Bezos–owned rocket, earning him some superlatives.

Today’s Atlantic-approved activity:

Schedule your aimless scrolling. Doing so could help you beat a phone addiction.

A break from the news:

Should Princeton exist?


Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox.

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